Kizil Lab moves to Columbia University!

We are happy to announce that we moved to New York to the Department of Neurology and the Taub Institute in Columbia University Irving Medical Center. We are thrilled to continue and expand on our work in zebrafish on Alzheimer’s disease in the great New York City at this great university! Stay tuned!

Our Viewpoint on the use of zebrafish for Alzheimer’s disease is out in ACS Chemical Neuroscience

We are happy to announce our Viewpoint in ACS Chemical Neuroscience on how zebrafish can help us to understand Alzheimer's disease pathology as well as help design new drugs. Zebrafish as an Experimental and Preclinical Model for Alzheimer’s Disease (click to open the publication at the publisher's site in a separate window) Journal cover from …

We discovered new potent multitarget lead compounds for synaptoprotection in Alzheimer’s disease

Happy to announce our publication in Journal of Medicinal Chemistry: Discovery of Potent Cholinesterase Inhibition-Based Multi-Target-Directed Lead Compounds for Synaptoprotection in Alzheimer’s Disease (click to open the link on the publisher's site) Graphical abstract Abstract: Drug development efforts that focused on single targets failed to provide effective treatment for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Therefore, we designed …

Zebrafish is not so far from humans after all when it comes to how the brain is affected by Alzheimer’s disease

Our recent publication about comprehensive comparison of the single cell/nucleus transcriptomics profiles of human Alzheimer's brains and zebrafish Alzheimer's model is out. We found remarkable similarities and biologically meaningful differences. To compare transcriptomics data in zebrafish model of AD and Alzheimer's patients (in entorhinal cortex, superior frontal gyrus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex), we first reliably integrated …

Missing Link Between Alzheimer’s and Vascular Disease Found?

Meeri Kim's article in the Columbia University Irving Medical Center Newsroom on our recent collaborative study with Dr. Annie Lee, Dr. Badri Vardarajan and Dr. Richard Mayeux. For more than 20 years, scientists have known that people with hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol, or obesity have a higher likelihood of developing Alzheimer’s disease. The conditions can …

From zebrafish to humans: our work helped to find the missing link between Alzheimer’s and vascular disease

Our study published in Acta Neuropathologica identified an important link between #vascular disease and Alzheimer's in #humans. This publication is a great collaborative effort and included important contribution from zebrafish. FMNL2 regulates gliovascular interactions and is associated with vascular risk factors and cerebrovascular pathology in Alzheimer’s disease. (Click to be redirected to the publisher's site) …